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Emscote Road, Warwick


Emscote Road, from junction with Broad
Street
Emscote Road is a road in the Emscote area of Warwick.

It's name is derived from Edulfus (a former land owner of the area) and cote (dwelling).

The road runs east from the junction with Broad Street and Wharf Street (where it becomes Coten End) all the way to Portobello Bridge, which crosses the Avon and marks the border with the New Milverton area of Leamington.

Kemp stated in 1905 that the district surrounding Emscote Road had sprung up in its entirety in the 100 years prior.[1] The road shown in its current form on the 1851 map of Warwick.[2]

Over its course Emscote Road it is crossed by both the Grand Union Canal (constructed around 1800) and the Birmingham Snow Hill to London Marylebone railway line (1852, the station for which is in the nearby Coten End area).

Roads that adjoin Emscote Road include Wharf Street, Pickard Street, Charles Street, All Saints Road. Until recently Avon Street also joined with Emscote Road, however a DIY store has now been built on the section that formally joined.

Buildings

Current (add)

1  
29 (Escape2)  
31 (Lord Nelson)  
61  
105 (Elephant And Castle)  
The Lawn  
Tesco  
Fleur De Lys Court  
Jersey Villa  

Former (add)

Lime Works  
Emscote Lodge  
Warwick Laundry  
Cotton Spinning Factory  
All Saints Mission House  
Lady Warwicks Home For Cripples  
Avon Power Station  
Tramway Depot  
Iron Foundry  
Navigation Mill  
Emscote Nursery  
Emscote Old Wharf  
The Emscote Tavern  
Emscote Mill  

Unknown (add)

Pumping Station  

History

Bridges

Portobello Bridge was built between 7th May 1831 and 9th April 1832. The former, pulled down in 1831 was Emscote Bridge, for which 10s had been left yearly in 1573 by Thomas Oken towards repair of. Walkways were added either side of Portobello bridge in 1881 when the tramway was lain.[3]

Buildings

In 1851 the tesco site was in use as a Lime Works. A large brickworks lay on the opposite side of Emscote Road.[4]

In 1857, at a cost of 15,000, water was started to be taken in from the Avon near Portobello bridge.[5] A bore hole had previously been drilled in Packmore Lane (now Lakin Road) in 1854 (near the canal) and although plentiful, the water found there was "hard and full of lime". A Pumping Station was built at Emscote in 1857 and at the start of 1858 water began to be pumped to the Water Tower on Market Street.[6] Whilst this increased the supply of water to the Town its quality was described in 1870 as being 'scandalously filthy'. This was due in part to the towns of Leamington and Coventry allowing raw sewage to enter the river upstream.[7]

The buildings between the All Saints Road junction and the railway bridge were in 1905 mostly villas, having been constructed within the past 30 or 40 years.[8]

In 1905 stood Lady Warwicks Home for Cripples just after Portobello bridge and All Saints Mission House at the foot of the Grand Union Canal bridge. Prior to this a cotton spinning manufactory stood near the canal, established in 1792 by Messrs. Smart and a lace manufactory, established in 1820 by Messrs Nunn, Brown and Freeman. The streets running North between the 2 bridges were composed of workmen's dwellings. Between the canal and railway bridges were mostly villas, built 30-40 years prior.[9]

Environment

The road was in 1905 tree lined.[10] On 20th June 1887, as part of the celebrations of the completion of Queen Victoria's 50th year in power, Chinese lanterns were hung from tree to tree by wire on Emscote Road and Coten End.[11]

Conservation Area

The first section of Emscote Road (up to number 17) is included in Area 1 of the Warwick Conservation Area.[12]

Gallery

Emscote Road, from canal bridge facing Leamington
Canal Bridge
Emscote Road


External Links

  • Windows on Warwickshire: Emscote Road (4)


    References

    1: A History of Warwick and its People by Thomas Kemp. Published 1905 by Henry T. Cooke & Son. Page 204
    2: Survey in 1851 by the Ordnance Survey Department in accordance with the previsions of the Public Health Act. Scale: Ten feet to one statute mile. Available at Warwick County Records Office.
    3: A History of Warwick and its People by Thomas Kemp. Published 1905 by Henry T. Cooke & Son. Page 204
    4: Survey in 1851 by the Ordnance Survey Department in accordance with the previsions of the Public Health Act. Scale: Ten feet to one statute mile. Available at Warwick County Records Office.
    5: 'The borough of Warwick: Warwick from 1835', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 8: The City of Coventry and Borough of Warwick (1969), pp. 515-521. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16056 Date accessed: 08 July 2009.
    6: A history of Warwick and its People. Thomas Kemp. 1904. Page 90
    7: 'The borough of Warwick: Warwick from 1835', A History of the County of Warwick: Volume 8: The City of Coventry and Borough of Warwick (1969), pp. 515-521. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=16056 Date accessed: 08 July 2009.
    8: A history of Warwick and its People. Thomas Kemp. 1904. Page 205
    9: Pages 204 to 205 of A History of Warwick and its People by Thomas Kemp. Published 1905 by Henry T. Cooke & Son
    10: A History of Warwick and its People by Thomas Kemp. Published 1905 by Henry T. Cooke & Son. Page 204
    11: A history of Warwick and its People. Thomas Kemp. 1904. Page 96
    12: A Guide to Conservation Areas - Warwick Part 1 (880kb, PDF): http://www.warwickdc.gov.uk/NR/rdonlyres/F2C3391E-F11E-4308-B10B-B9CB60313430/0/UrbanConservationArea_Warwicksec1.pdf

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